Family mentions in newspapers

I just posted links to all my clippings here. Most of them are at newspapers.com, so if you click the link in the heading you will go to a better image that you can enlarge. The small ones can be printed; the larger ones are a pain no matter what I’ve tried. A few of them are just scans of clippings or photocopies people have given me (no links), and I have no information on dates or publications.

Seeing ancestors’ homes without traveling

I drove past my German great-grandfather Rudolph Seehawer’s home yesterday. Well, technically I was in a Google Maps car that drove past it in July 2012 and digitally recorded the view so it could go online for me to enjoy. Here it is:

seehawer-home-neuhof-nowy-dwor-2-cropped

It took me some time to find it. Long story short, I had a couple of poor quality photos from cousins so I knew what I was looking for. The problem was finding the town. It was called Neuhof, or New Farm, when it was in Germany. Now it’s in Poland and called Nowy Dwór—and there are many towns in Poland with this name, many that don’t show up on Google Maps searches.

But I finally located the town and found myself moving (clicking) up the road and seeing the house as I approached!

Here’s one I found in England–the graveyard where my great-great-great-grandparents Jacob and Hannah Spencer are buried in Wotton-under-Edge, Gloucestershire:

wuecemeteryandtabernacle-google

Too bad I can’t get out of the car to read the headstones. Zooming in doesn’t help (believe me, I tried!).

Here’s the house in Reading, Berkshire, where my great-great-grandmother Mary Ann White Spencer worked as a servant until she married Joseph Spencer (now a restaurant and bar):

2londonst-google-cropped

And here is the farm where my great-great-great-grandparents John and Elizabeth Lewis worked and raised their family in Bisley, Gloucestershire:

catswoodfarm-google2010-cropped

By the way, I have seen some beautiful scenery in my “travels” along roads in Europe.

Google Maps work in the USA, too. I don’t know when I’ll ever be able to visit Chicago, but I found the house my great-grandfather Joseph Spencer bought or had built in Chicago in the early 1900s:

maysthousefromgooglemaps-cropped

I tried to find my great-great-aunt Lizzie Barrows’ boardinghouses on Wentworth in Chicago (where my grandparents lived at times), but unfortunately they’re not there any more.

I’m not finished and probably never will be. I don’t have exact addresses for most of my ancestors, but I still plan to virtually explore Norway (where my grandmother lived) and the area of the Czech Republic that used to be Austria (where my grandfather-in-law lived). I’m sure I’ll think of more!

All photos in this post courtesy Google Maps.

Ready to share all after 50 years

My Aunt Flippy saved this letter I wrote to her asking for family history information in 1965.
My Aunt Flippy saved this letter I wrote to her asking for family history information in 1965.

After 50 or so years of working on my family history (and 40 or so of working on my husband’s), I’m finally ready to share my research with the world. Really share it–not just put some of it on my website. Every individual, every source, every note. I’m motivated by the knowledge that I won’t live forever and our unmarried, childless sons are not even slightly interested in my work. Ironic that the family history nut would have only these two descendants, huh?

To access my “pedigree resource files” (one for each major branch), go to FamilySearch Genealogies and search for any ancestor or (deceased) relative you have in common with me. When you click on a name and go to that person’s page, you will see a description of the file and the name of the submitter at the top so you will know whether it’s my file (look for “Laurelroots”). You will be able to click on links to move around among the generations. In general, I’ve included ancestors through our ggg-grandparents. Living persons are hidden.

Frustrations

It was important to me to make the information available permanently and freely. None of my websites or social media accounts will be permanent. Ancestry.com and other sites like it require you to pay for a subscription to view donated files. I don’t think anyone even knows Rootsweb exists any more. That left FamilySearch.

FamilySearch is free to everyone, and you don’t even have to register to search and see most of its records. And if the LDS files aren’t permanent, none are (with their granite vault and all).

The downside of FamilySearch is it is so—to put it kindly—clunky. I will just say that it has taken me weeks to be able to search for and find individuals in the files I’ve uploaded. That seems to be fixed now.

I had hoped to provide links to the files I’ve uploaded so family members can go straight to them. That’s impossible. Maybe it’s for the best since I can’t update the files; when I get new information I can only delete and replace them.

Another problem is FamilySearch is so zealous about protecting the privacy of living persons (not a bad thing) that it completely removes them and they cannot serve as links between the deceased person and his or her ancestors. In other words, if you find a deceased person whose parent is still living, you will be at a dead end.

Why don’t I just use FamilySearch’s Family Tree? I tried. I just don’t have the patience and tolerance necessary to deal with it. I did spend many hours laboriously adding information there. Then Family Tree dangled “possible duplicate” links in front of stupid users, and they erroneously merged individuals I’d worked on into their individuals (some of whom were totally different people and many of whom had incomplete or incorrect information). When you merge someone with photos attached into someone else, the person with the photos attached is deleted and the photos are orphaned (to be found only in a search of Memories). It’s too stressful for me.

What’s next?

Now that I can finally cross this off my list (huge sigh), I am moving on to writing out all the memories I’ve collected from relatives over the years. I’m excited about this project because these memories become even more precious and rare after it’s too late to talk to our family members about them.

My hope is to publish the memories in an electronic book at Google. It should be both permanent and free there.

And there are the photos. I’ve been blessed with many old family photos. I’ve tried to share them freely over the years, but I’m now facing the same problem I did with the genealogy files. Besides being free and permanent, the site I use must allow lots of large files. I’m still looking for that.

For now, my best photos are attached to individuals in FamilySearch‘s Family Tree. To see those, you have to register with FamilySearch (it’s free) and search for the individuals under Memories.

I just hope it won’t take me 50 years to cross these off my list.